Kata dari Yogya
 
Hello everybody,

G’day, Selamat Siang and Sugeng Siyang,

Today I would like to talk about a few things. The mysterious Indonesian illness, masuk angin, its treatment and gombal.

Masuk Angin

What is this? Google Translate inaccurately translates it as to ‘catch a cold’ or alternatively ‘take a cold’. It’s probably not quite anywhere near right, well maybe that translation covers part of masuk angin’s meaning, but certainly not all of it. If ‘catch a cold’ covers part of its meaning, the literal translation covers the rest. Masuk angin when translated into English literally means ‘enter wind’. And well, that’s what happens, the wind determinedly makes it way inside of you.

The other week, we had just finished eating breakfast at a rather nice restaurant, which according to the Lonely Planet guide, “attempts to serve cakes, pies and pastries with a healthier twist”. (I don’t know what this means) on Jl. Kaliurang (which for you who may one day take part in Indonesian ‘Who Wants To Be a Millionaire’, Kaliurang means Prawn River in Javanese). We had just finished eating and I was feeling a bit unwell. Nauseous and my stomach was bloated, like a well inflated tire. I remembered the Lonely Planet review “attempts to serve cakes, pies and pastries with a healthier twist”, where on earth were they going with that review? It seems well, unfinished, maybe the next part was but instead they serve soup that make you nauseous, makes you fat and then kills you and the reviewer died from the deadly soup before they had a chance to complete the review. It seemed rather unlikely and a bit unfair when I thought about it. And to be honest I wasn’t feeling particularly well earlier that morning either. Not quite 100%, maybe 75.8%.

My friend proudly diagnosed me with masuk angin, I had the symptoms, (from top to bottom), an uncomfortable body, a bloated stomach, I was exhausted, sleepy and nauseous. (Check out the page on wiki)

He suggested that I try a traditional Javanese cure, kerokan. I had a heard about kerokan before, I was a little bit apprehensive. Kerokan according to Wikipedia:

Kerokan is a traditional Indonesian folk cure, wherein a coin or ladle is drawn across the back. This action supposedly helps to release "wind" from the body by increasing blood flow near the skin's surface. The practice can also cause marking or injury.

I had seen some photos of friends who had undergone kerokan and it doesn’t look exactly, well, pain free. However, it was pain free and I almost fell asleep. :) I think the above definition should be corrected. The word supposedly should be removed. It works. You keluar angin, hehe ‘exit the wind’ after kerokan. I spent the afternoon sleeping, burping and sorry mum, popping. I got better and survived masuk angin.

This however is not the end of the story.            

The next day I was talking with an Indonesian friend in Australia on Face Book, (imagine I was quite proud, I had just endured, what looks like at least, an extremely painful local treatment).

The conversation that followed is well, one of those slightly awkward cross cultural exchanges that make you laugh afterwards. I am extremely grateful to my friend for his concern for my welfare at the time and his support to post this conversation. Thanks, mate.

For native Indonesian speakers it will be immediately obvious where the misunderstanding was. But for English speakers and even second-language Indonesian speakers the misunderstanding may not be so obvious. First I will translate the conversation as I thought it was happening, then I will explain. Ok, I am A and my friend is B.

A:hehe ia mas , sy dikerok pertama kali kemarin haha

A:hehe yeah mas, I got kerok­-ed for the first time yesterday haha

B:looh di kroyok dmn????
kok bisa??

 B: What!, Where did you get kerok-ed?
 How could that happen?

A: haha  sama teman mas ... perut sy kembung kemarin mas ... merasa mual haha ... but I'm feeling a lot better now, mate       
haha 
habis dikerok haha

A: haha by a friend, mas… my stomach was bloated yesterday … I felt nauseous haha but I'm feeling a lot better now, mate       
haha
after been kerok-ed haha

B: tmn mana nick?
trus urusannya gmn?
orang mana?

udah selesai apa berkelanjutan>

B: which friend, nick?
what was it all about?
where were they from?
is it all over or is it still going on?

A: teman di sini mas , orang jogja mas haha ia mas , sy sudah membaik mas
terima kasih mas 

A: a friend here, mas , from jogja mas, haha yeah mas, I’m all better now mas
thank-you mas

B: Jangan gitu,,
dilaporin polisi..
apa perlu saya minta bantuan om saya nick?
biar benar2 kelar?
kebetulan tugas dijogja juga

B: don’t be like that
report it to the police
do you need me to ask my uncle to help you nick?
so you can work everything out
he’s in jogja at the moment

A: haha kenapa mas ?

A: haha why mas ?

B: ya biar semua kelar nick
ntar ada belakanganya, or masalah lagi
teman kuliah atau gmn?
km baik2 ajkan nick?


B: yeah, so it’s all worked out nick
otherwise later there’ll be history, or more problems
a uni friend or?
you’re all right yeah nick?

Ok. I’ll stop there. What happens next? I’m afraid you’ll have to wait for me to explain a few things first (or alternatively scroll down to the bottom of the page). I realised at this point something was definitely not quite right. I looked in the dictionary and it turned out there was definitely something not quite right. Haha… My friend had read dikerok as dikeroyok, which I originally thought was an alternative spelling of dikerok, the passive form of the verb meaning to receive kerokan, the surprisingly enjoyable treatment for masuk angin. It turns out that it wasn’t. Dikeroyok instead, according to Stevens and Schmidgall-Tellings in a Comprehensive Indonesian-English Dictionary means “to be attacked in a mob”. Different. A little bit. Haha.

Ok so here is the conversation again as my friend understood it.

A: hehe ia mas , sy dikerok pertama kali kemarin haha
 
A: hehe yeah mas, I got bashed up for the first time yesterday haha

B:looh di kroyok dmn????
kok bisa??

B: What!, Where did you get beaten up? (not actually kerok­-ed, like I thought, but beaten up hahaha)
How could that happen?

Suddenly, the meaning of the whole conversation had shifted haha…

A: haha  sama teman mas ... perut sy kembung kemarin mas ... merasa mual haha ...but I'm feeling a lot better now, mate       
haha 
habis dikerok haha

A: haha by a friend, mas… my stomach was bloated yesterday … I felt nauseous haha but I'm feeling a lot better now, mate       
haha
after been beaten up haha

B: tmn mana nick?
trus urusannya gmn?
orang mana?
udah selesai apa berkelanjutan>>

B: which friend, nick?
what was it all about?
where were they from?
is it all over or is it still going on?

A: teman di sini mas , orang jogja mas haha ia mas , sy sudah membaik mas
terima kasih mas 

A: a friend here, mas , from jogja mas, haha yeah mas, I’m all better now mas
thank-you mas

B: Jangan gitu,,
dilaporin polisi..
apa perlu saya minta bantuan om saya nick?
biar benar2 kelar?
kebetulan tugas dijogja juga

B: don’t be like that
report it to the police
do you need me to ask my uncle to help you nick?
so you can work everything out 
he’s in jogja at the moment

A: haha kenapa mas ?

A: haha why mas ?

B: ya biar semua kelar nick
ntar ada belakanganya, or masalah lagi
teman kuliah atau gmn?
km baik2 ajkan nick?

B: yeah, so it’s all worked out nick
otherwise later there’ll be history, or more problems
a uni friend or ?
You’re all right yeah nick?

That was the point where I realised something was not quite right and I checked the dictionary.

A: haha ... maaf ya mas .. dikerok mas karena masuk angin ... tidak dikeroyok

A: haha… sorry mas, kerok­-ed mas because of masuk angin … not beaten up by a mob.

B: owalah,,,,
jadi karena sakit?
bukan fight?

B: oh,
because you were sick?
not because of a fight?

A: hahaha ia mas ... kerokan mas 
bukan fight mas 

A: hahaha yeah mas, kerokan mas
not a fight mas

B:hahahahaaaa..
enak kan kerokan,,hehe

B: hahahahahah...
kerokan is nice yeah … hehe

:)

Gombal

Ok, before I head off I want to quickly talk about gombal.  The last few months have seen a new trend emerge in Indonesian comedy television called gombal. Gombal is the name for a style of flirting that, is well incredibly corny. It is usually, but not always, in the following question and answer format:

Cowok:  Apa Bapak kamu ______ ?

Cewek: Iya, kok tau sih?

Cowok: Soalnya ________

Guy: Is your dad a _______ ?

Girl: Yeah, how did you know?

Guy: Because *insert corny line here*

I’m not completely sure why girls inherit qualities from their father’s profession or from things their father’s like to do, but it … I really don’t know. Here are a couple of examples:


Cowok : Bapak kamu pasti pemain bola kan?

Cewek : Ih, Abang kok tau sih?

Cowok : Soalnya kamu telah mencetak gol di hati Abang

Guy: Your dad must be a soccer player, right?

Girl: Huh, how do you know?                                                     

Guy: Because you’ve scored a goal in my heart

 

Cowok : Bapak kamu suka main internet ya?

Cewek : Iya, emang kenapa Bang?

Cowok : Soalnya kamu udah men-download hatiku

Guy: Your dad likes to the surf the internet yeah?

Girl: Yeah, how come?

Guy: Because you have already downloaded my heart.


Cowok:  Dek, Bapak kamu pilot ya?

Cewek:  Iya Bang, kok tau sih?

Cowok : Soalnya kamu udah nerbangin hatiku

Guy: Your dad is a pilot, right?

Girl: Yeah, how did you know?

Guy: Because you’ve made my heart fly

 
Cowok : Kamu punya peta nggak?
 
Cewek : Peta apa?

Cowok : Peta hatimu. Karena aku tersesat dan tak bisa keluar dari hatimu.


Guy: Do you have a map, no?

Girl: What sort of map?

Guy: The map of your heart. Because I’m lost and I can’t get out of it.

Ok haha , that’s all for today  hahaha galauuuuuuu ni… I’m galau ? (galau a useful all-purpose word to describe the restlessness that love can make you feel)  

Best wishes from Yogyakarta,

Watch out for enter wind !

Catch you soon,

Nick.

 
 
Sugeng Sonten !
Selamat Sore !
Good afternoon !

Hello everybody, sudah lama tidak laut ! long time no sea (or ocean) ! 

m_tHa apOn YoH ceMan2. Cowwyy ! 

What? Wait, what language is this? Actually it's an exciting phenomena known as bahasa alay, which can be translated as something like stupid over-the-top language.  The formal Indonesian and English translation (hehe) is Minta ampun ya teman-teman. Maaf! and Please forgive me friends. Sorry! ... hehe :p Lebaaaaaaay ? 

But actually, I am sorry that I haven't posted in the last few weeks. There has been a frankly unrealistic amount  of university related tasks (although they all have been quite exciting) to complete over the last few weeks.

Oke oke, today I would really like to talk about three words; mangga, semangat and bule. These aren't just any three words but they are three exceedingly common yet rarely taught words.

1. Mangga

This next section is not about the Indonesian word that means mango (that delicious fleshy stone fruit belonging to the genus Mangifera) but the Javanese word for absolutely every situation. Well, not quite, but almost. Pronounced monggo it is roughly equivalent to the Indonesian words silahkan and  mari. It functions as a polite invitation word, as a polite acknowledgement as you pass somebody in the street and as a word that means 'please go ahead' (apparently it can also mean spider?). Some examples:

1. Mangga, dipundhahar.
    
    Please, begin eating.

2.   As you pass an old man in the street.
      A: Mangga, Pak.
      B:.Inggih, mangga mangga Mas.
     

This last example is actually exceptionally difficult to translate into English,  I'm not quite sure how to translate it honestly so instead I will try and explain it. In the first sentence the speaker is politely acknowledging an old man’s presence and then the older man acknowledges the younger speaker in return. Inggih is a connecting word. Pak is a Javanese and Indonesian vocative and title for older men. It is from the word Bapak meaning father. Mas is also a Javanese word originally meaning older brother (from kangmas) but can also be used as a respectful term of address for young men. The female equivalents are Ibu and Mbak. Ibu and Bu are used for older women and Mbak (from mbakyu) which means older sister can also be used as a respectful term of address for young women. The Javanese kinship system and Indonesian address terms are both very exciting topics and I hope to write about them both soon.

In conclusion, mangga is a very cool word and an excellent (although quite expensive) brand of local chocolate.


2. Semangat

There is nothing like this word in English. Which is unfortunate because it’s a really nice word. It is often rendered as something like ‘spirit’ or ‘keep the spirit’. Maybe life-force? It’s the stuff that keeps you going. Indonesian’s really enjoy wishing each other semangat to encourage each other to not give up.

 It also has some quite exciting cool combinations and adaptions.

Semangka – Is a blend from semangat and kakak (older sibling) , it’s also the Indonesian word for watermelon. 
 
Semangka ! Semangat kakak !

 It has also become bahasa alay-afied. The over-the-top language hehe... becoming either cemungut or cemungudh.

Cemungudh ceman ceman !

Semangat teman teman !

Keep the spirit friends ! (hehe... it does sound a little funny, doesn't it?)

Coca-cola also realises the importance of semangat for Indonesians, their slogan over here is Segarkan semangatmu, Refresh your spirit (http://refreshspirit.coca-cola.co.id/?WT.cl=1&WT.mm=hero-refreshspirit) hehe... Semangaaaaaat !


3. Bule

Bule is also an interesting word. It is the generic Indonesian term for a white person or a westerner. Although some foreigners feel a little bit uncomfortable being referred to as a bule they can take comfort in the word’s origin. Bule was originally used to refer to the type of cattle sacrificed in the honour of foreign guests.

However , despite it’s lofty origins it can’t be denied the meaning has shifted now. According to the national dictionary (Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia, KBBI) bule just refers to an albino or a white person. It doesn’t really have a negative connotation, it’s sort of just more a statement of facts.

So next time you are surrounded by an outlaw bikie (bicycle) gang of 10 year old Javanese girls giggling and remarking that you are a bule, enjoy it, it’s not going to happen anywhere else.

Hehe oke..., burung Irian burung cenderawasih, cukup sekian dan terima kasih !

Thank-you every one ! Have a good one !  

Salam dari Yogyakarta,

Nick.

 

 

   

   




   

 
 
A useful and polite way to let the friendly mas/mbak know that you're short one ice tea.

Permisi mas/mbak, kayaknya es teh kurang satu.

Excuse me mas/mbak, I think we’re missing one ice tea.

Kayaknya and the more formal sepertinya (from kayak and seperti respectively meaning ‘like, as) are fantastic Indonesian hedgers. They both mean something like: 'It's looks like... it’s seems that… it’s as if." (By the way a linguistic hedge probably should not be mistaken for http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedge or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedge_(finance) they're a little bit different. hehe Linguistic hedges are: intentionally non-committal or ambiguous sentence fragments, not lovely shapely masses of manicured tree or a risky financial undertaking.

Kayaknya and sepertinya have a useful role in introducing statements where the speaker wants to say something that hearer might not want to hear. For example:

A: Mas, kamu ikut ngga nanti malam?

B: Emm kayaknya gak deh. Ada acara lain soalnya. Lain kali aja mungkin?

A: Mas, are you coming tonight?

B: Um, I don't think so. I've got something else on, maybe another time?

Some other examples of kayaknya/sepertinya in action: (from a quick Google search!)

Ups! Tautan ini sepertinya rusak

Oops, it appears this link is broken

Burungku sakit deh kayaknya, diem aja dari kemarin

It seems like my bird is sick, it's been quiet since yesterday.

Sepertinya, that's all for this post hehe... :D 

Salam dari Ngayogyakarta,

Nick
 

Hello !

08/31/2011

4 Comments

 
Hello everybody!

I'm sorry it's taken me so long to load this first post. There has been a serious outbreak of jam karet in Yogya and it turns out it is contagious.  Fortunately I'm only, at least at the moment, suffering a very mild case.  Hehe...

Unfortunately jam karet is not an exciting tropical disease or Cottee's latest venture into the booming Indonesian breakfast spread market but instead it is a very Indonesian concept of time. It translates literally as rubber time and that's exactly what it is! A 10.00 appointment often takes place somewhat closer to 11 or 12 and nobody seems to be remotely concerned or even bothered by this. It's fantastic: D. (The only thing impervious to jam karet is cinemas which screen movies before or exactly at the time printed on the ticket.)

That's enough of the jayus (stupid, not funny) excuses. I want to present a very very brief overview of the linguistic situation in Yogya.

Formal Indonesian is, somewhat unsurprisingly limited to formal places; government offices, educational institutions and it is in the mass media. However, even in these contexts its role is limited and is somewhat functional. In contrast, informal Indonesian is alive (not that formal Indonesian isn't) and exciting. Two particular registers of informal Indonesian, bahasa gaul (The language of cool) and bahasa gay (gay language) have a special place in the hearts of Indonesian students. However in Yogya, Javanese is undoubtedly the most commonly spoken language, especially among native Yogyanese. 

I want to dedicate time to both Indonesian and Javanese and their registers properly over the coming months, but for now I want to end this post with some bulan puasa or Ramadhan specific vocab, the whole country is on holiday at the moment pada mudik returning to their villages to spend time with family and friends to celebrate the end of the fasting month and to mohon maaf lahir dan batin, to ask for forgiveness in both this life and the next.

Banners and billboards all over the city wish people ‘Selamat menunaikan Ibadah Puasa’, Success in the Fasting Month from 'INSERT COMPANY NAME HERE'. In true Indonesian syncretism, a number of these banners, billboards and adverts are from companies that sell products that people give up during Ramadhan, namely food, drinks and cigarettes. One particular cigarette sponsored Ramadhan themed billboard made me giggle in a way that only Indonesia can. The company’s catchphrase is berani enjoy? Are you brave enough to enjoy?  Their Ramadhan themed billboard read: berani ngaku salah, enjoy minta maaf, be brave to admit your faults and enjoy asking for forgiveness.  Crazy : )

Just before I go, there is one more word that I want to share, it was easily one of the coolest activities over the last few weeks, ngabuburit, which roughly translates to : hanging with your friends whilst trying to find a place to eat to break the fast at sunset hehe However it shouldn’t be confused with ngabubowling though, hanging with your friends whilst waiting to break the fast at the local bowling alley.

That’s all from me for the moment. I will hopefully have the next post up in the next two weeks.

Salam dari Yogya,

Nick

 
 
Start blogging by creating a new post. You can edit or delete me by clicking under the comments. You can also customize your sidebar by dragging in elements from the top bar.
 

    Author

    Write something about yourself. No need to be fancy, just an overview.

    Archives

    July 2011

    Categories

    All

    RSS Feed